My Walden Adventure

So, I had always heard about Walden, CO … a small town in Jackson County.  It’s other claim to fame is the self-proclaimed title of the “Moose Capital of Colorado”, boosting hundreds of them.  I certainly hoped that we would see some moose, but our purpose on this trip was not the moose, but rather an Endangered Species, but more on that in the next blog post.

So off we went, my good friend Amy and I, on our adventure.  It was my first trip there, so I had no idea what to expect.  It was about a 4+ hr drive, but with us, it tends to take longer.  You guessed it … lots to see along the way, therefore lots of photo stops.  LOL

It wasn’t long before we started seeing lots of deer … often crossing the road in front of us, but sometimes just hanging out on the snow covered landscape along the way.

850_1214It wasn’t just the deer either … we came across several groups of wild turkeys.  It was such a cool sight to see this tom turkey chasing one of his ladies.  LOL850_1295-EditThe herds of elk were much more elusive and stayed relatively higher except for a herd that was crossing a field down low.850_1375One of my favorite sightings is a northern harrier (as some of you know) so when I saw these two fly by, soaring over the field, I was thrilled.  Funny, but to me they almost seem to be holding hands … or should I say … wings.  ❤500_9443Other birds witnessed along the way were the ever abundant horned larks …500_9506… and a personal favorite of mine, the American dipper.  500_9410Once we arrived into Walden, we drove around the area to see what we could see.  Canada geese were plentiful everywhere, and it was quite a thrill to see several northern pintails.500_9517In addition to that there were also northern shovelers… so very pretty.500_9782Pied-billed grebes were also plentiful … and they were sporting their breeding plumage.500_9927Then the white pelicans flew in and sort of stole the show.  In Florida, we got our share of white pelicans, as well as brown pelicans, but we never got the white pelicans in their breeding plumage.  See the horn on their bill?  That is present when they are ready to breed and then afterwards they lose them.500_9732The pelicans worked with much effort and speed to feed in the waters.500_9887Probably one of the more interesting observations with these pelicans was the interaction between 3 of them.  One was clearly in the lead and when it would change course, the two immediately following changed course.  The two following would also get quite aggressive with each … challenging and snapping beaks.500_0182Finally, one of the two grabbed the first one by the neck and thrashed it left to right and then eventually straight down into the water, while the other simply watched.  Not sure what that was about … but I have my hunch.  :-O500_0274Later the two were swimming together notably alone.  I just love how for “white birds” they are quite colorful and full of detail.500_0229-Edit-EditDriving down a dirt road, we came across this lovely hawk.  It was calling out repeatedly in what could only be compared to as a red-tailed hawk call.  However, this wasn’t a red-tailed hawk, but rather a Swainson’s hawk.  It was then that I realized how similar their calls sounded.  It was quite persistent too … calling over and over.500_2845During our travels we came across a pair of American kestrels, which I believe might have been beginning to prepare their nest.  The pair were flying around and announcing their territory.  Isn’t the male just gorgeous?500_3470Now one of the star raptors always is the golden eagle and there was no shortage of them.  Quite beautiful in flight as they make their way past us over the landscape.500_3442Being that Tom and I have been doing a lot of raptor observation lately, I knew right away from its field marks, that this was indeed another golden sighting.500_2696Of course, there were a variety of birds spotted throughout the sagebrush landscape.500_3411Some were even showing off for the camera.  🙂500_3387We then headed back to the lake and found several otters playing … of course, they were a bit camera shy and headed out for a more distant view.500_3090We also found muskrats and beavers in an adjoining waterway.  The surface of the water was like glass and as such the beaver’s head had a perfect reflection whether it was coming or going.500_3273500_3292-EditWell you can’t come to Walden and not look for moose, right?  OK, so we did eventually do that, but at first I had to get some beautiful mountain bluebird poses and images.  Is there any prettier bird out there?500_3012So we did finally get our moose sightings … about 5 if I remember correctly.  Early spring  moose are not that exciting, as the bulls have already lost their antlers and re-growth hasn’t started.  Also, they tend to be more secretive and deep into the brush foraging for food.500_2964The sunset was also fabulous and I think, the perfect way to end this blog post.  There was so much seen and photographed.  Too much to include everything in this post, so forgive me for not sharing it all.  Yes, Walden is a magical place.850_1601

Next Up:  The main attraction in Walden … i.e. Why we went.  🙂

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com                 http://www.tnwaphotography.wordpress.com

 

 

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My Local Everglades National Park

There’s been a lot of talk about #mypark … indicating what national park is your favorite.  Sometimes people choose the park that they find most beautiful … or perhaps the one that they can relate to the most … or even the one geographically closest to them.  It’s a very individual perception and designation.  For me, I would have to say that Katmai NP is “my park”, though I certainly don’t live anywhere near it, though I do absolutely adore the wildlife and landscape of Katmai.  For me, another NP, which is actually closest to me, is Everglades NP.  It’s a place of diverse beauty and landscape … and depending on the season and other environmental factors, its presentation is very different.  Like all of the national parks though, its a fragile habitat and environment, and we need to protect them and the wildlife living in them.  In the case of the Everglades, it’s also critical to our water supply in Florida.  Enough said ….

Usually in the summer, our visits to the Everglades are fairly sparse.  It’s hot, humid, and buggy during the summer.  Sometimes those conditions extend into the other seasons as well.  We did make a few visits in the beginning of winter and found it pleasant … well except for those mosquitoes.

One can find white pelicans there, as this duo shown feeding on the surface of the water near Flamingo.  Brown pelicans can also be found year-round, but these white pelicans are more winter residents.dsc_2003 American avocets are a favorite of mine, especially when they’re in their winter plumage, as this adult female is.  Love their grace as they swim or walk around the shallow water foraging for food.dsc_2760 You can almost always count on the American kettle to make an appearance when visiting, though sometimes they’re more cooperative than others.dsc_3535 Such graceful beauty in flight as they patrol the area for a meal.dsc_2580 Another common resident year-round is the red-shouldered hawk.  They’re quite smart predators too, as we watched this one tagging alongside the riding lawnmower man, taking advantage of the grasses being stirred up, making insects much more accessible.dsc_3324 A variety of hawks, as well as turkey and black vultures, are a sure thing, especially when warm and windy, as they seek out thermals to circle in flight.  dsc_2841 In the Flamingo area of Everglades NP, there are always many osprey found and in the winter, they are generally pairing up through courtship behaviors and nest building.  The adults are always easily identifiable due to their yellow eyes, versus the orange eyes of juveniles.  The female adult also generally adorns a “necklace” across their upper chest.dsc_4173 It’s a blast to watch and photograph them as they fly around … leaving and returning to the nest … as they bring in food and nesting material, as well as defend their nest.  We watched one day as a vulture tried to land in the nest.  Well, that didn’t go over too well, as the occupant of the nest and its mate (from a destination in the distance unknown) went into aggressive modes to defend their nest.dsc_2091 It’s fun to watch as the female gets excited when she sees the male coming in with some dinner.  (Note: the dark mottled “necklace” feathers indicates this one is a female).dsc_2213 What this female didn’t count on was her mate being very defensive with the fresh fish he brought in.  It reminded me of a dog being teased with a toy, as he jumped around and around, keeping an easy pick of the fish away from its mate.  Eventually, it flew off with the fish, which he devoured a bit, then returned with it … finally surrendering it to its mate.dsc_2306 I don’t think that she liked that initial “hoarding” of the food and she screamed at him when he left with it.  LOL
dsc_2120 After she got her share of the meal, I guess that he was forgiven, since they worked on the next generation of osprey.  😉dsc_2481On this particular day, we encountered a bit of a rain shower.  I just loved the way that this male osprey perched itself near the nest, dropped its wing and bowed its head, in an attempt to speed off drying its wings.
dsc_3206 An appropriate end of the day … and the blog … is the appearance of a rainbow, as seen right over the nest of the osprey couple.  I think rainbows are a lucky sign of what’s to come.  Wishing them the best in their nesting endeavors.  🙂_dsc1881Next Up:  More from Everglades NP

© 2017  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

There’s a First For Everyone

Earlier this spring, we took a trip out west … Tom drove cross country from Florida to Washington state … I flew to Salt Lake City and Tom picked me up along his journey.  We were meeting up in Yellowstone NP with some friends, but not before heading over to the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah.FullSizeRenderWe had never visited there before, many times driving right past the exit on our way in or out of SLC.  This year was the year to visit and though we got off to a late start, we were certainly glad that we finally got there.

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and is accessed via your vehicle on a 12-mile drive alongside the wetlands within its 74,000 acre boundaries.  Being from Florida, I just LOVE areas that can be accessed by vehicle and when we arrived the weather couldn’t have been nicer.  This was our first time that we photographed the yellow-headed blackbird, which seems larger than our red-winged blackbirds, but behaves quite like them.  They were flying everywhere and seeing that bright yellow head, I immediately thought I was seeing an oriole of some type.  However, it wasn’t and I’m sure I’ve seen them before, just never investigated more about them.  They’re beautiful.  🙂DSC_1400When we had stopped in at the Visitor Center, we educated ourselves as to what we might see along the way.  I was quite excited to hear that we would be seeing grebes … mainly western and Clark’s.

It wasn’t long before we saw our first Clark’s grebe.  Having only been around our pied grebes before (again, at least from what I can remember), I was surprised at how much bigger they looked.  They sure were beautiful too, especially with breeding season in full swing.  DSC_0870Sometimes we would see lone grebes, but before long, we noticed many pairs swimming about.  They look very familiar to the western grebes and in the beginning I had a hard time telling them apart.  Years ago, reportedly they listed them as a species within the western grebe, but then since they nested nearby without inter-breeding, they got their own species.  Overall, their black heads and white around their eyes, made them identifiable to me.  I’ll show the difference in a few images.DSC_0853I just love the way they swam around in unison, with their head positioned in unison as well.  DSC_0963Another difference between them and the western grebes is the color of their bill.  As you can see, this grebe has more of a yellow-orange bill.DSC_1757The refuge also had many other birds including these avocets, possessing their stunning breeding colors.DSC_1050The primary grebes that we saw were the western grebes.  As I mentioned earlier, they possess more black coloration around the eye as well as a greener-yellow bill.  DSC_1488Love that face with that spunky hair.  LOLDSC_1490They are the largest of the North American grebes.  I so wished that we would find some with babies on their backs.  DSC_1592Before long, we could see a storm out of the horizon brewing … it was an awesome sight.  Ultimately, we had windrain … then hail.  FullSizeRenderAs quick as it all started, it made a quick exit.  Thankfully!

I was quite surprised when I captured a great blue heron fly past us … with a red-winged blackbird providing him an escort out of its territorial area.  Love it when little birds boss around much larger ones.  🙂DSC_1022OK, I know that by this point in the day, the light was extremely harsh, but I want to share these images anyway.  This grebe got himself a fish, or so we thought.  Then he swam it over to its mate.DSC_1716She graciously accepted it of course.  It was a tender moment shared and I was quite excited.DSC_1726Down the hatch it went and they celebrated.  DSC_1743White pelicans were also out in force at particular section of the road.  It was fun to see them and I almost felt like I was back at home seeing them.  Well, also due to the immense numbers of mosquitoes out there!  OMG, I thought earlier how happy I was that this was a drive, but in reality, it was HORRIBLE for shooting from the car, at least from my side.  Every time I opened the window I was blasted by the most wicked mosquitoes I have ever seen and I’ve from south Florida (aka mosquito city)!  DSC_1824It was actually better to get out of the car because the winds were strong and kept them from landing on, and biting, you.  Pesky little critters.  The periodic outside walking was great too for capturing the birds without spooking them.  This lovely pair came really close as I sat still by the side of the dirt road.DSC_1834At one point there were 5 western grebes swimming about.  Two sets of paired grebes and then 1 lone grebe, who was intent on spoiling the party for the pairs.  It would approach a pair, then get chased off!DSC_1840At one point after the loner was defended against, the male came back to its mate with the sweetest face.  Though I didn’t get a shot of it, they swam off and danced on the waters surface … like 2 dolphins dancing on the water.  I almost broke into tears, it was so beautiful.  As much as I watned them to, they didn’t repeat their dance of love for me.DSC_1874As you can see by the number of images I took of them, I was fascinated by their look, behavior, and beauty.DSC_1881I kept seeing motion in the water.  Sometimes it was carp which had found their way into the wetlands … very strange to see.  Other times it was muskrat swimming around, gathering up leafy green branches for their home and nest.  I was thrilled to watch them as they went about with their renovations.DSC_1666I had to laugh as the grebes would swim in pairs, but then dive under independently, emerging from the water, looking around for its mate.DSC_1970They were calling out to each other, a sort of “Marco … Polo” game ensuing.  LOL.  DSC_1965Often it would take several calls before they found their way.  I tried helping them out saying “she’s over there” and pointing, but I don’t think it helped.  🙂DSC_1994We were also treated to eared grebes, but they tended to be more shy of the camera lens.  They were fascinating for me to see.  Though I live in Florida and therefore photograph birds often because of that, I’m definitely not a birder by nature.  So it was fun to spend a day trying to learn more about these birds of Utah’s Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge.  The eared grebes are the most abundant grebe in the world (I did not know that!)  Also, amazing to me is that it is flightless for 9-10 months of the year.  Amazing!  Though I live in Florida and therefore photograph birds often because of that, I’m definitely not a birder by nature.  So it was fun to spend a day trying to learn more about these birds of Utah’s Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge.DSC_1281I love terns and there are so many varieties of them with very distinct differences between the different species.  This beautiful forster’s tern made its appearance for us on our way out.DSC_2090It is the only tern that is almost exclusively found in North America, so that makes it pretty cool to me.  Never knew that either.  DSC_2091We had a great time, mosquitoes and all, at the refuge.  We will be sure to visit again soon. If you’ve never been there, you might want to do the same.  🙂

Next up:  Just a few owls … not burrowing, not eastern screech … hmm, what can they be?

© 2016  TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com