Western Slope Birding in Late Spring

Back to checking out the local birds of the western slope of Colorado.  What I have found since being here is that you never know what … or where … you ‘re going to find our feathered friends.

Case in point, while visiting a local park, we saw a flock of birds arriving at the lake.  I looked and immediately declared (to myself) that these were glossy ibis.  After a quick check for CO birds, I noticed that they don’t get glossy ibis like we did in Florida.  Rather, these were white-faced ibis.  Very similar except for the white colored face … both species though are very beautiful with their iridescent feathers, especially in the light.850_1634Common terns also call my new area home and often seen flying overhead.500_3614One species that we never see in FL (I guess one should never say “never”) are the western grebes.  These birds tend to summer with us and are quite beautiful, especially with that red eye that they possess.850_1653850_1662850_1664850_1667American wigeon taking off across the lake.500_3626Of course, raptors pass through in numbers too.  Take the American kestrel for example … always flying by seemingly in such a hurry.850_1669-EditAlong the water’s edge one can find an assortment of shorebirds, such as this wonderful spotted sandpiper.500_9907Up in the trees, yellow warbler congregate as they flutter in an out of the branches.500_9484Western kingbirds are quite the noisy bunch and difficult to miss when they are present.  500_9872500_9866This male black-headed grosbeak is a routine visitor as well.500_9764While a western kingbird is a type of flycatcher, we also have ash-throated flycatchers.  I just love their head feather crest.500_9689Of course, closer to home, I can always count on the house finch, as well as a variety of other sparrows and finches.  We had so many outdoor cats in our neighborhood in FL, so we never did the bird feeders, but we have here … and also the bird bath fountain, which is a personal favorite of mine to observe.  🙂500_9954Next up:  3 letters … beings with “f” and they get me quite excited when I see them.

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com                www.tnwaphotography.wordpress.com

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Sheep, Deer, & Views … Western CO

So, I think that this blog was going to be about the San Juan Mountains and surrounding areas, but oh well, I changed my mind.  LOL.  I thought that instead I would share more images of the area landscapes and wildlife in my more immediate area.  Are we good with that?  🙂

From our windows, we have amazing views of the Colorado National Monument.  The wonderful red rock formations are stunning, especially after a rainfall or when the sunlight is hitting it just right and illuminating the rocks.  So many colors, like painted rocks or striations in the layers.  Just really peaceful and beautiful.

DSC_8052-EditFor me, the desert bighorn sheep are always the highlight of my visit and it’s always a dreat day when I do.  On this day, we ran across a gathering of the ladies.  I’m always so impressed with how naturally they act when we encounter them.DSC_7677-EditNo different than other wildlife, they’re eyes engage me and their thoughts are a mystery to me that I always try, though never will, to figure out.  🙂DSC_7693-EditDSC_7605-Edit-EditWhile the close up views of their faces are always fascinating, so are the more natural ones where the sheep may not even know I’m watching.  DSC_7657-Edit-EditLots of mule deer are always present and I really enjoy photographing them as well.  This handsome buck posed nicely for me … in the midst of the wilderness.  Often they fear onlookers, and perhaps with good reason, but if you remain still, they almost seem to enjoy an impromptu photo session.  LOLDSC_7876Fun to see the younger generation being mentored by their elders.DSC_7752Speaking of “being schooled” … how about this sequence of this beautiful buck showing how to properly jump the fence.  DSC_7739DSC_7741DSC_7742We watched the entire group make the jump successfully.  So fun to observe and photograph.  Then we came across this really handsome buck … staring us down.  There goes that eye contact again.  After some time, he went on with his foraging on the landscape, which really pleased us.DSC_7979Back on the Monument, we came across a whole herd of desert bighorn sheep.  They are a subspecies of the bighorn sheep usually associated with the mountainous areas, but as one would expect, living in a desert primarily, they are a bit smaller in size.  However, I’m sure that everyone would agree that they’re equally as cute.DSC_8358-Edit-EditThis particular male was in charge of this group of lovely ladies.  Aren’t their eyes so amazing?  They have excellent eyesight, capable of viewing a predator over a mile away, and their eyes also help in guiding them on the rocky cliffs from which they live.DSC_8223Here’s a shot of just a few of them within the herd.  The adult male in the forefront center is keenly watching us.DSC_8155Of all of the desert bighorn sheep ewes up there, this particular one is always easy to identify and fun to photograph.  She’s missing one of her horns, which unfortunately don’t grow back.  But you can’t tell me that she doesn’t look quite happy!  🙂DSC_8435Sometimes, try as you may, you don’t find them.  Sometimes you can spot them through your binoculars or hear them in the distance.  Then sometimes, you just can’t seem to get away them … or pass them … like when they’re causing a “bighorn jam” in the middle of the narrow winded round.  It’s OK, I could watch them forever it seems.DSC_8313Yes, the beauty of the Colorado National Monument red rock formations is a sight to see, whether you take it in up close and personal like this … or when you wake up and see it out of your bedroom window … it’s all beautiful and all good.  🙂DSC_8057-EditHope that you enjoyed the blog and have gained an appreciation of the beauty of western Colorado … just minutes from Utah.

Next Up:  More around town sightings … you just never know what you’ll see

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com