Western Slope Birding in Late Spring

Back to checking out the local birds of the western slope of Colorado.  What I have found since being here is that you never know what … or where … you ‘re going to find our feathered friends.

Case in point, while visiting a local park, we saw a flock of birds arriving at the lake.  I looked and immediately declared (to myself) that these were glossy ibis.  After a quick check for CO birds, I noticed that they don’t get glossy ibis like we did in Florida.  Rather, these were white-faced ibis.  Very similar except for the white colored face … both species though are very beautiful with their iridescent feathers, especially in the light.850_1634Common terns also call my new area home and often seen flying overhead.500_3614One species that we never see in FL (I guess one should never say “never”) are the western grebes.  These birds tend to summer with us and are quite beautiful, especially with that red eye that they possess.850_1653850_1662850_1664850_1667American wigeon taking off across the lake.500_3626Of course, raptors pass through in numbers too.  Take the American kestrel for example … always flying by seemingly in such a hurry.850_1669-EditAlong the water’s edge one can find an assortment of shorebirds, such as this wonderful spotted sandpiper.500_9907Up in the trees, yellow warbler congregate as they flutter in an out of the branches.500_9484Western kingbirds are quite the noisy bunch and difficult to miss when they are present.  500_9872500_9866This male black-headed grosbeak is a routine visitor as well.500_9764While a western kingbird is a type of flycatcher, we also have ash-throated flycatchers.  I just love their head feather crest.500_9689Of course, closer to home, I can always count on the house finch, as well as a variety of other sparrows and finches.  We had so many outdoor cats in our neighborhood in FL, so we never did the bird feeders, but we have here … and also the bird bath fountain, which is a personal favorite of mine to observe.  🙂500_9954Next up:  3 letters … beings with “f” and they get me quite excited when I see them.

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com                www.tnwaphotography.wordpress.com

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Colorado’s Highline Lake State Park

Colorado State Parks consists of 42 individual parks which highlight the natural beauty and outdoor adventure experiences of Colorado, giving the public much to be proud of and lots of recreational opportunities.  Highline Lake State Park in Loma is one of the closest to us … just a mere 13 rural miles.  Needless to say, we go there a lot.

As the name implies, the park consists of two lakes, Highline Lake and Mesa Lake.  Recreational opportunities include boating, SUP’ing, canoeing, fishing, hiking, and even mountain biking.  Tom rides the trails out there … Debbie goes out to explore and photograph nature … all is good!

DSC_2381Birding is big there too.  In the summer and fall, many birds use the lakes for feeding, such as the terns, eagles, osprey, etc.DSC_2251DSC_2238Western meadowlarks can also be seen buzzing around the landscape.DSC_2281In mid-September, you can already begin to see some of the early seasonal changes in the landscape._DSC2969_DSC2979-EditEven the bunny rabbits seem to be out enjoying the beautiful days.DSC_2325Sometimes, when the water level is just right, shorebirds run up and down the shoreline.  This killdeer and its mate are quite noisy as they nervously run about, trying to avoid the camera’s lens.DSC_2387No one can miss it when the yellowlegs fly in … as their announcement is loud.  LOL.  Once landed though, I don’t think he liked the spot, so it left soon afterwards.DSC_2367The short-billed dowitcher didn’t seem to mind my presence and wasn’t shy in approaching me since that’s where it wanted to feed.DSC_2485The detail in its feathers were incredibly fascinating and the light played in its eye.DSC_2436Hanging out with it was this semi-palmated sandpiper … seemingly going left when the dowitcher went left and right when it went right.  I guess it figured it was safer that way perhaps or maybe playing clean up.DSC_2480Either way, it sure was equally beautiful, especially when its image was reflected on the surface of the water below.DSC_2498As I mentioned, perhaps they were hanging around together for safety, as the red-tailed hawks were numerous and quite actively flying overhead.DSC_5801-EditDSC_5815Of course, on the softer side of things, the northern flicker woodpecker also calls the trees within the park home.  Usually for me woodpeckers seem to run me in circles around trees, as they run in circles around them too foraging insects.  However, on this day at least, this flicker gave me a bit of a break and sat still and alert for a brief few seconds.  Thanks!DSC_5865-Edit-2As the month rambled on, the colors began to emerge and it was actually quite breathtaking._DSC0267The only thing that was prettier that the actual view from afar of the seasonal color changes was that of its reflection.  It made the vision and joy twice as nice!_DSC0270-Edit-Edit-EditEspecially when you zoom in and get more of the details of the view.  This is how I like to remember the lakefront of Highline Lake.  I wish I could keep it looking like this forever._DSC3321-EditI waited for this one to get into the reflection of the golden trees … just also wished it would have been closer.  I guess you can’t have everything, but at this moment, it seemed like it was enough.  🙂DSC_6127I hope that you enjoyed getting to “know” Highline Lake State Park too.  More to come from this park on a later blog, so stay tune.

Next up:  It’s all so Grand, in the Tetons that is  🙂

© 2017  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

A Florida Farewell

Before I take a look back at 2017 as a whole, I wanted to take the time to share some images and thoughts from my last photography outing with some of my Florida friends prior to us heading out to Colorado.

In July, Tom & I took a break from packing, boxing, and cleaning our south Florida home and made plans with a group of my friends for what would be my “farewell shoot” in 2017 from Florida.  My good friend Annette asked me where I wanted to meet up or what I wanted to photograph.  Hmmm … I wanted owls … barn owls I told her.  That being said, we made plans to meet up in Belle Glade, which is located in western Palm Beach County.    I was quite excited!

When we arrived, I ran out of the car without my gear of course, to give out some hugs to everyone only to have a BOBCAT run across the ditch right next to where we were assembling!  Dang … not one of us had our cameras out.  Reminded me of how many years ago, we all watched a bald eagle come out of nowhere and pick up a fish from the lake, right next to us.  Haha.  You think I would have learned.  However, after the excitement of the bobcat we all settled in and found a yellow-crowned night heron sitting quietly in the bushes.

DSC_8719After not immediately finding a barn owl, we decided to explore the nearby waters.  Amost immediately a tern made a splashdown on the surface.DSC_8749It then proceeded to fly away to the other side … guess it was something that we said, perhaps.DSC_9006

There were many black-necked stilts present … of varying ages … and the parents made sure that we knew they were there by calling our presence out.DSC_8794It was a community of stilts and they were in the water, on the shore, and in the air.  Many of them were going about gathering up their young. DSC_8852I have always loved the black-necked stilts.  I find them quite elegant in their stature and in their movements and as parents, they are top notch.  Love the red eye on this female.DSC_8867-Edit-EditAs I mentioned, they were quite active.DSC_8874Their young were foraging about in the shallows of the water, quite independently I might add.  Such little fluff balls for sure.  🙂  And check out those long feet!DSC_8924Sometimes they were congregated together … all set up in a row.DSC_9114We even found a few out in the grasses.DSC_9180Along the gravel road, as we traveled about, we came across what turned out to be common nighthawks.  From far away, we couldn’t tell what they were, but upon closer inspection, it was easily identifiable.  Such a beautiful bird and one that I had never photographed before, I was quite thrilled with this encounter.DSC_9102A few of them stayed on the roadside, but others flew erratically about, darting around us and eventually returning to the original spot.  I’m not sure, but I think that they had a few young ones with them, which possibly weren’t as skilled in their flight.DSC_8977-EditTom has always seen many of these on some of the “hills” of south Florida when he would fly his RC gliders, but not me.  I read a bit about them and one of the things that I found most fascinating is that they have been known to consume as many as 500 mosquitoes in a single day!  I say, let’s have  lots of these birds around … not being a fan of mosquitoes myself.DSC_9158So by now, many of you might be wondering … did you ever find the barn owls?  Of course we did!  And of course, this was mainly the view that I was afforded … LOL.  I was amazed at their size when spotted so close up.DSC_9205At one point, we spotted a hawk up in a tree (red-shouldered, I believe) as it scouted around for its next meal.  I love the look of intensity in its eye … combined with that sharp beak … you know that it means business.DSC_9259It eventually found its way to the top of the tree, and flew away after some prey.DSC_9272Upon closer inspection … Look who else was in the tree …. another beautiful barn owl!  I wonder if the hawk knew that the owl was there.  I think that the owl knew because the owl kept its eye on the hawk until its departure.  DSC_9327So in the end, yes, I did in fact get my barn owls, amongst other birds and even that bobcat sighting.  As fascinating as all of that, it was really the presence of my dear friends that made the day most special.  Thanks so much to Annette, Connie, Donnie, Ivan, and Rob for being part of Tom and I having such a wonderful day out in Belle Glade.  Thanks to Rob for taking our commemorative shot … especially with the bonus barn owl in the shed window  ;-).  Great day, fun times, amazing friends.  Until we all meet again.
IMG_0355 webFunny story too … and true one … is that when we gathered for the group shot, we wanted it to be in the shade since it was so hot and humid.  There was this giant tree to our left side and we thought that it would be a perfect spot for an owl to hang out and so we inspected it for a few moments.  No owl … or so we thought.  In fact, a barn owl flew out of the tree as we were setting up for this shot!  I think he wanted to say goodbye to me too.  ❤

Next up:  A look back at 2017 … it was a roller coaster one to say the least.

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com