Our Last Teton Hurrah!

We stayed 3 days in Grand Teton NP, but of course, each day is substantially different that the one before … or the next for that matter.  Coming in from Jackson Hole, we immediately pass by the Elk Refuge, which was no longer covered in snow and the elk were largely leaving already.  However, there was a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the area.

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We observed him for quite some time.  The light was far from optimal for capturing its beauty, but we sure got some fun poses and behaviors from it.  How fascinating those talons are!

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When we first arrived to GTNP, the Antelope Flats was fully closed, but by day 3, it was partially open.  I wanted to photograph the famous Moulton Barn in the snow cover, so we went as far as we could on the road, then hiked in the rest of the way.  I was a bit surprised to see the the snow cover was missing in some areas … still it was so beautiful and particularly fun, especially since you could “hear” the silence … yes, we had it to ourselves.

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Along the way, we came across numerous ice patches in the gravel road.  I was fascinated by their beauty.

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Their geometric shapes were so interesting and each one was unique.

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Some of the frozen ice patches were frosted and opaque, while others were clear and full of bubbles.

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At one point, I noticed something fly by … it was quite beautiful … and to my shock, it was a mountain bluebird … already in mid-March!  Yes, it had been a mild winter and we later learned that this was the beginning of their sightings.  I felt so privileged to be able to partake in their beauty.

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Of course, that wasn’t the only bird that we sighted, as many species of duck and other water birds were present as well.

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This Canadian Goose had its own version of ice fishing … which we found quite entertaining and quite comical.  🙂

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We made a special trip to see the bighorn sheep again.  This time it was the ewes and the lambs and juveniles that we encountered first.  The herds were already up on the mountainside.

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Mama was teaching the young ones an important lesson in their survival skills … how to navigate those rocky cliffs and ledges … to evade their predators.

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I was thrilled to be able to witness them as they tested their skill, though I have to admit, I was probably more nervous than both of them put together!

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Stunned … that’s how I felt as they descended in almost a complete vertical fashion, down  the ledges and rocky landscape.  I know that they’re hooves are specifically equipped for such travel, but it’s still heart-stopping to observe.

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When they decide to “haul butt” too, they can sure get up and go!

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I know that I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again … nature is so amazing!

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Of course, there’s so much more beauty in the landscape of the Tetons to explore as well.

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I didn’t want to leave, but we had to get back to Bozeman for an early morning flight the next day.  I noticed that a storm seemed to be coming, as the mountain range soon became shrouded by the clouds.  As we left the park and Jackson Hole, we started out towards the Teton Pass.  Wouldn’t you know it … it began to snow … a fairly heavy snowfall too.  I call it “divine intervention” … you know, making it OK to leave, for photography would become difficult for a bit.  Except for, that amazing beauty of the area in mid-snowfall … yes, that’s its own beauty.

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Until next year, when we will most surely return, goodbye Tetons!

Next up:  More birding in Florida

© 2015  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

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A Grand Teton Homecoming

Always a much anticipated visit is Grand Teton National Park and the community of Jackson Hole.  It has so much to offer … from landscapes to wildlife, it never disappoints.

This year we met up with an amazing photographer, Jen Hall, whom I met originally on Flickr.  It’s always such a pleasure to shoot with locals, so we met up in the early pre-sunrise hour and headed off to get some morning first light.  It was absolutely perfect!

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Unlike Yellowstone NP, the Tetons still had a fair share of snow covering the ground, which is always exciting for us.

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Having already photographed bison, moose, bighorn sheep, mule deer, coyote, pronghorn, as well as a few other animals, I still felt the void of the red fox, as I didn’t get to photograph one in Yellowstone.  I REALLY wanted to have a fox encounter, so it was high on my list for the day.

We passed by other wildlife, in search of the sly fox, who was doing a good job in avoiding us.  I’ve always found that when you try so desperately to find a particular subject, it can sometimes elude you.  After hours of looking for a fox, we pretty much took a break, myself figuring that it wasn’t in the cards for that day.  There’s something to be said for staying put and allowing wildlife to come to you.

All of a sudden “eagle eyes” Tom became alert and noticed something emerging from the trees in the snow.  Sure enough, there it was … a magnificent-looking fox.

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After the scurry of reaching for the cameras, I don’t think anyone said one word, fearing it would alter its path, as it was headed right in our direction.  I personally don’t believe that I was even breathing as I clicked away.

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Gosh, it sure was stunning to see and it was quite cooperative with us, as it eventually sat down not far from us (as we were sat still inside our vehicle).  It didn’t seem to be in a rush to get anywhere … in fact, seemed quite sleepy and bored.  LOL  At one point, it gave us quite a yawn … couldn’t believe all of those teeth, which by the way, were quite clean-looking.  🙂

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At first,we thought it was a female (mama), but soon realized it was a male, as it seemed to mark anything and everything it could as it traveled in it path.

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At one point, it became quite interested in something … as it hunted … and ultimately came up with a tasty morsel, which it quickly consumed.

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Must have been good too, as it quickly licked its chops!  LOL

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Last year I photographed a red fox for a bit, as it moused in the snow.  It was quite fun, but also quite far.  This guy was a bit more “chill”, but he made up for it with his closeness to us and his cooperation as well.  Clearly someone had taught this guy a thing or two about camera angles.  🙂

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Once that red fox was checked off my list of wildlife to photograph, we were open for business for the other wildlife, such as the bighorn sheep.  We encountered a large herd of rams as they were slowly, but surely, making their way across the landscape.  Some young ones were in the group too … this one guy clearly had a bit too much energy too … as he jumped almost incessantly, head-butting his buddies.

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As they navigated to the mountainside, I was so impressed with the speed they possessed.  Yes, it was a great encounter as well.  Such magnificent creatures!

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So whether it’s wildlife or landscapes, it’s all beautiful and rewarding for the visitor taking it all in.

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More images and stories from Grand Teton NP will be featured in the next blog post, so stay tuned!

© 2015  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

I Need My Photography Fix!

After spending several days skiing, while Tom, Kelli & Mitchell snowboarded, I decided that I wanted to have a break.  I dropped them off at Powder Mountain near Ogden and started my way to Antelope Island State Park.  I had been there last winter and it was so beautiful all covered in snow, with the waters frozen as well.  Of course, that wasn’t the case this year, for the winter had been such a mild one … no snow at all … limited ice … warm … I couldn’t believe it!

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Unsure as to what I was going to see, I began to tour the island and look for wildlife.  Usually, one doesn’t go far before bison, mule deer, coyote, etc are spotted.  But what in the world was this?  I had no clue, but learned about it along the way.

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It was a chukar partridge, which is in the pheasant family.  Not native to the area or anywhere in US, it was imported here as a game bird … makes sense.  Come to find out that its actually an Eurasian bird, and the national bird of both Pakistan and Iraq!  Well, I guess you learn something new everyday (at least I do – LOL).

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This guy was so beautiful with such remarkable markings in its feathers.  It would sit up on one of the large rocks on the landscape and watch … and call out … and observe some more.  I was being very careful as to not disturb it and to my surprise it just let me photograph it.  He apparently was communicating, in a sentinel fashion, with the rest of his colony, though I never saw them.

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Further up the road, I encountered several coyotes as they searched for a quick bite to eat.  It was amazing to me that in the brown past-winter landscape, how difficult it was to spot from afar.  Thank goodness I had my binocs with me.  🙂

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Being that he was very intent on hunting, thus probably very hungry, I didn’t shoot long.

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Ended up down by the ranch, where a lone pronghorn antelope was making its way.  Wonder why he was there all alone like that?  Seemed like out on the flats like that, all alone, he/she would be an easy target.  Looked for the great horned owls … found their nest, but didn’t see either of them this year.  All in all, it was a beautiful day, but a bit slow for wildlife.

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So, as I made my way back to exit the park, I bid my new Chukar friend, adieu.  He was still hanging out and playing the role of “the watchman”.  Doing a fine job at it as well too.

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This shot from the Visitor Center area gives you some perspective of the landscape both there as well as SLC area across the way.  So very beautiful!

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The next day, we had one more day of snowboarding/skiing before we had to say goodbye to Kelli & Mitchell.  Gosh, it’s so pretty out this way in the winter.

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Next up:  “Hoooo” wants to see more owls?

© 2015  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

Our Last Denali Day

So on our final day in Denali NP for 2014, what did we wake up to?  You guessed it … another bluebird day.  🙂  After a restful morning (the only one on our entire trip – LOL), we set out to “troll” again for wildlife and try our luck at Savage River.  As you can see the fall colors were already beginning to pass, though still evident and colorful, their vibrant peak of explosive color was already a thing of the past.

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Savage River is a wonderful place for taking a leisurely hike around the Savage Loop Trail along the river, as it meanders its way.  The cold fresh air, the sounds of the water rushing by and the birds calling out overhead, and those clear beautiful skies made for the perfect day to end with in our week long stay at Denali.

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It’s just so picturesque.  Knowing that this would be more of a landscape walk-about, I carried my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens mounted on my D800 camera body.  Tom outfitted himself with his 70-200mm f/2.8 lens onto his D7000 … just in case we encountered wildlife.  See, in years past, we’ve gotten amazing shots of the marmot sunning themselves on the rocks along the trail.  So, we were really scouting hard to find some.  Unfortunately, we never did find any and admittedly, I felt a bit dejected.  😦  But I reminded myself that we had an amazing stay in Denali already and certainly in Alaska as well.

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At some point, I saw a photographer shooting something on the hillside.  Of course, I had to know what it was.  Armed with a pair of binoculars, Tom was still unable to ascertain what it was.  Perhaps he was just shooting the landscape, but he had a longer lens.  Curiosity got the best of me and I inquired with another person who had spotted him as well.  To my surprise, he said that there was … wait for it … a LYNX!  I surge of excitement ran through my body as I set off uphill with my … wait for it … 24-70mm lens.  Sweet!  Quickly I realized that I had like… no chance … so I commandeered Tom’s 70-200mm and pursued that lynx.  🙂

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OK, now I’ll admit that this are not the stellar shots that I was hoping for, but I’ll take them!

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This lynx was intent on observing something … perhaps even more intent than we were on observing the lynx.  LOL  We photographed it for quite some time … just 3 of us … and I was thrilled beyond belief.

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Finally, the lynx got up and began to retreat from us, but not before giving us that “vogue” look.  It reminded me of the first lynx that I ever tried to photograph … only that time I missed for 2 reasons:  1. Our shuttle windows were frozen shut and therefore we couldn’t get the windows down.  2.  Once our windows finally were successfully lowered and the lynx gave me that same “vogue” look over the shoulder, I clicked and my shutter, only to realize that I had the shutter speed set to “bulb” from trying to photograph the aurora the night before.  Ugh … don’t you just hate when you’re not prepared?

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I vowed to never make that mistake again … you know, heading out without a wildlife lens … just in case!  After encountering and photographing this lynx though, I felt on top of the world again.  See, the lynx was seldom seen in Denali in 2014, since the snowshoe hare have declined in numbers lately, as they run in 7 year cycles in their plentiful numbers – just as the lynx do.  Nature at work again.

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So short of the marmot, our wildlife sightings this year were amazing and plentiful.  As we headed to return to the RV, we’re once again treated to this expansive sight.

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The colors have finally arrived towards the lower elevations of the park … aka the first few miles within the park boundaries.

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Before we leave Denali NP, we opt to take one last hike in the Riley Creek area.  The trees are showing off beautifully against the skies covered in patchy clouds.

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No trip to Alaska, or just about anywhere away from home, is ever complete without our trademark cairn building and an image of our creation.  Built out of river rocks along the Riley Creek waters, Tom and build our cairn … one rock at a time … each representing a year that we’ve been together … united by our love for each other and for nature and the outdoors.  17 rocks in all … & counting  ❤

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© 2014  TNWA Photography

 

I Didn’t Forget About Denali NP (Who Could?)

How do you know when you’re going to have a great time in Denali National Park?  Of course … when your first image goes something like this … how can you miss!  Denali is always an amazing place, but when you combine the beauty of the Denali wildlife & wilderness with the arrival of the fall colors and add a dash of sensing the beginning of the moose rut, this is what you get.

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Of course, on our first day in Denali NP, we were also greeted by the feeling of the arrival of winter as well!

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Now some visitors might have been quite bummed to have this greeting waiting for them, but when you reside in the heat and humidity, you tend to be quite excited!  SNOW! … and lots of it!  (Thanks to Rebecca Tifft for snapping this image of Tom & I for us)

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Denali NP is unique in that one can only explore the first 15 miles in their own vehicle.  After reaching Savage River, one can only travel to the interior of the park on a bus … whether it be an interpretive one or simply a shuttle bus.  But that doesn’t mean that awesome views and wildlife can’t be found in those first 15 miles.  The clouds in the skies provided for amazing landscapes.

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Shortly after Savage River, one starts to look for caribou, amongst other wildlife.  In the late summer/early fall, the bulls may still have their velvet covered antlers or the velvet may have already been shed, leaving their antlers to be quite bloody looking.

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Bears are also quite often seen right outside your shuttle window.  This particular one was walking along the braided river and eventually entered the river to cross it.  Funny … if you look closely, it seems as those this one has white nails.  Apparently, they can have a variety of claw colors, though I found this one quite unusual.  LOL

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Sometimes, they are quite far away.  However, the sight of observing this sow and her 2 cubs, as they travelled across the snow covered landscape was pleasing to me.  Gives the viewer a sense of the vastness of the land … as well as the harshness of the winter-like conditions that they and the other wildlife endure.

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It wasn’t our first snowfall experienced in Denali, in fact once we had snowfall in July!  You just can’t predict the weather in Alaska … especially in Denali.  What you can predict is that you’ll be treated to some of the best wildlife viewing in the US.  When you get to see the animals in the midst of the snow-covered landscape, you’ll also know that you hit the jackpot!

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The landscape itself looks so dramatically different in the snow too, whether dusted with a thin cover of snow or dumped upon, it’s all quite breathtaking.

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The iconic view from Stony Hill Overlook is quite different in the snow, but still remarkable.  Now that I think about though … it’s always different no matter what time you visit.  Sometimes you get full mountain (Mt McKinley, aka Denali), which we did on several days while we were there, sometimes you get no view at all, and sometimes you get this partial view.

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And the viewing of Denali constantly changes throughout the day, so you can never give up on trying your luck (except of course when it’s dumping snow relentlessly, as it was on our first evening in the park).  🙂

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Unique images of the wildlife, desperate to continue to get their fill of nutrition before this unanticipated snow storm becomes an expected daily event, make for amazing photo opportunities.

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Photo ops … it’s not just for the bears … as this adorable red fox entertains us with its own “vogue” looks as well.

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In the early evening, the snow cover from the night before had already began to melt, thanks to the clear skies which usually follow the snow’s nasty skies.  More bull caribou are encountered dining on the autumn-kissed tundra.  Below is actually a great example of how the bulls might have their velvet (on left), or may have previously shed their velvet already (on right).  Like most things in nature, everything progresses at its own pace.  The females which are pregnant later in the season will keep her antlers, while the other females as well as the bulls, will eventually shed them after the mating season.

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The moose rut usually takes place later in September or early October, so lots of bull moose begin to arrive near the front of the park (i.e. those first 15 miles) about this time and begin to jockey for superiority and the sweetest females.  🙂

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Often at this time the females will hang out with other females.  Sometimes they are followed closely by a bull that might be in pursuit.  The bulls are quite patient and wait until the time is right.

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Of course, the sunsets of Denali NP are also a sought after image, though I find myself torn between pursuing wildlife images OR the landscapes … Decisions, Decisions, Decisions … and a nice “problem” to have.  Wouldn’t you agree?

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Stay tuned:  More to come from Denali NP and its grandeur.  I promise, I won’t make anyone wait that long either.  🙂

© 2014  TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

Cruising Potash Road

Whenever Tom travels in the country, he always holds a fascination of learning the history of an area.  So when we were staying in Moab, he decided that one afternoon, in lieu of getting some afternoon rest, we would head out on Potash Road, just outside of Moab.

The road itself is in a gorge which follows the Colorado River.  It is a mecca for rock climbers and at any given time, they can be found in their helmets and harnesses along the shoulders of the road.

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Also along the way, the area is known for the ancient rock art and petroglyph panels which can be seen roadside.  I found them quite fascinating.  When you would stop to observe the obvious ones, after some time, your eye would find more details, more panels, more pictures.  One could say even more stories from an era gone by.

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Of course, there was one that was supposed to be a bear, so I couldn’t rest until I found that one … LOL.  Thanks to the guide on the roadside that gave me more direction as to where it could be found.

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Though we didn’t investigate this fully, there are also dinosaur tracks found along the way, for those so inclined to locate them.

Wildflowers were plentiful along the way, which complicated the red rock formations present, which contrasted so beautifully with the flowing waters of the Colorado River and the lush green landscape on its shores.

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We even came across some type of lizard which scrambled near my feet and all but gave me a heart attack … wasn’t expecting that.  🙂

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Arches aren’t confined to Arches NP and one can access several different arches off of Potash Road.  One of the more accessible ones, visible from the road, is Jug Handle Arch.  Gee, I wonder where it got its name from?

DSC_4056 If one continued to take the more primitive road past the potash fertilizer plant, it would lead into Canyonlands National Park and all of its beauty that the area offers.  Yes, it was truly a wonderful and relaxed drive.  Though my body was craving my pillow, blanket, and mattress … I was glad that Tom shamed me into the afternoon exploration.

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On to Canyonlands NP and Dead Horse Point SP next … be sure to stay tuned.

 

Experience Heaven on Earth – Garden of the Gods

Tom and I were able to get away in April, so we decided that we wanted to return to Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northeastern Arizona.  The first order of business once we landed in Denver was a quick escape to Colorado Springs.  Of course, a favorite place of mine when there is the Garden of the Gods.

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For those of you might be unfamiliar with it, think rock formations … red rocks, white rocks, rocks that take the shape of camels kissing, etc.  Also, Garden of the Gods is well known in Colorado for its rock climbing opportunities.

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On this particular visit, we arrived in the late afternoon.  I was armed with my landscape gear, since that was my purpose of being there.  We set off on one of the trails that weaves through the park and almost immediately we run into a rather large group of mule deer.

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I’m not sure who was more alarmed by whom …. the deer seeing us or us seeing the deer (probably the latter).  Yes, nothing like taken wildlife shots with a 24-70mm landscape lens! After making the best of the situation, I was able to get some landscape shots as well.  There’s something so special about the light, the rocks with their colors and textures, and the varied landscapes within “the garden”.

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The next morning we got up early to be able to get the sunrise, but we didn’t quite make it there on time.  Nonetheless, the scenery was beautiful.

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We were greeted by several birds who were calling nearby and then dodging in and out of view to check us out further.

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We then made our way back and set off on a walk again, but this time from the northern end of the park.  Again, we ran into a family of mule deer, but these were much more at ease with our presence.

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In addition we saw numerous bunny rabbits hopping around off of the trails … so cute.  No coyotes this year, like we had seen on numerous occasions the last time we visited.  But we did see many more birds, like the swallows, western scrub jays, and prairie falcons.

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On of the bird sightings that left me a bit surprised was the Canadian Goose, for they would come calling overhead quite loud and eventually land on the tiptop of some of the rock formations within the park.  For some reason, I found this unusual … probably because I usually see them on the ground or in the water, not flying, and landing high.

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Everywhere you ventured was another breath-taking shot.  If I lived in this area, I think I would wake up every morning and visit there to take in all of the beautiful landscape and occasional wildlife.  I find it so wonderful that this park belongs to the City of Colorado Springs on land that was donated to the city for preservation of its unique features, with the promise that it never implement a charge to the public.  I know that Tom & I sure appreciate that.

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Palouse Region 2013

As I mentioned in the last post, there was a trip that I took in 2013 that I never fully gave it the attention that it deserved.  Being that it was almost one year ago exactly, I thought that I would go down memory lane and share some of the sights and stories behind my experience.

Before we would visit Oregon, I insisted that I would visit the place that I had dreamed about ever since several of my photography friends posted images from there.  I was so excited as we arrived into Spokane for a few days of the Palouse.

We drove to the infamous Steptoe Butte for our first glimpse of the rolling farmlands of the region.  I was pretty much speechless (a difficult to accomplish state for me) as I looked out.  I hurried to set up my gear and my tripod … you know, because the light was just perfect._DSC0569

 

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What I didn’t realize is that the light does move around with the day, but it always seems to give such a lovely glow on the landscape.  The shadows actually helped to make it more interesting, varied, and beautiful.  I felt that I could stay there all day, night, and through the morning.  Of course, we didn’t but I sure took my share of images!

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The actual Palouse region, which is highlighted by the Palouse Scenic Byway, covers quite the massive area … 208 miles of the most incredible beauty.  I wanted to see each and every mile along the way!

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One of the more interesting areas within the region that we had a chance to visit was Uniontown, WA.  In particular, there was a place known as Artists at Dahman Barn, which was photographically interesting on the outside and fun for shopping on the inside – all while supporting the work of the local artists.

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Eventually, we traveled over to Palouse Falls State Park, home to one of the most spectacular and beautiful waterfalls in the state of Washington.  The falls seems to come out of nowhere … and drop ~ 200′.  I wished we had been there at a better time of the day, but our schedules were hectic and we did the best that we could.  In addition, the skies were threatening with a nasty storm that appeared to be heading our way.

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One of the more entertaining residents of the park were the yellow-bellied marmots, which seemed to be just about everywhere once your eyes became adjusted to their presence.

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I knew that we needed to make our way out of Washington state and into Oregon, but I vowed to Tom that I would return to the Palouse again.  I think (fingers crossed) that will be in 2014.  🙂

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Come To The Island … Antelope Island State Park

We’re getting ready to head back to Utah soon where we will explore Arches NP and Canyonlands NP, as well as Monument Valley, for our fill of landscape images and hopefully, some night photography as well.  To get my wildlife “fix”, we’re also planning on spending some time in Rocky Mountain NP.

But as I was thinking about Utah, I started to think about the time we spent in Utah in February.  For my family, it was a snowboard trip, but for me it was a photography trip, with a side helping of skiing.   🙂

Not far from Salt Lake City is Antelope Island State Park.  We spent several days visiting the island, which is accessed via a causeway into the Great Salt Lake, connecting the island to the Wasatch Front Range.  It comprises 28,000 acres, stretched over a length of 15 mi and 5 mi across.  Interestingly enough, the island is home to over 40 freshwater springs which produce over 30 million gallons of water per year … all while being surrounded by the Great Salt Lake!

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It was first explored in 1845 by John C. Fremont and Kit Carson who also named it Antelope Island, after the population of pronghorn antelope that grazed there.

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It’s quite the fascinating place to visit … each season brings a different perspective to the island.  In the winter, I found it much easier to spot the wildlife, as they made their way across the snowy and icy landscape.

In fact, on this trip, we saw more coyote than I think that I ever have there!  They seemed to be just about everywhere …

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… on the ice …

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… on the road …

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… hiding in the brush of the tundra.

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Of course, there were more wildlife sightings than just the coyotes.  Mule deer were sighted as well.

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The coyotes saw the mule deer as well, which signaled the “dinner time” bell in them, so off they went to try to stalk one down.

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The poor deer, though quick making their way over the brush, were on high alert!

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There were so many deer on the island and apparently the Utah state parks have had issues with the lack of deer in other areas, so were stumbled across the Department of Natural Resources conducting a catch of some of female mule deer, for ultimate re-introduction into another park, which had decreased numbers of deer recently.  It was quite interesting the assembly that they had going on.  I know this is a horrible shot, but check out the multi-level carrier netting system they used to transfer the deer to their station for inspection and then transportation.

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In 1848, the Fielding Garr Ranch was erected, which was the first permanent residence on the island.  In 1981, the island and the ranch were bought by the State of Utah and thus turned into the state park of today.

We also had sightings and interactions with other wildlife, such as the great horned owls, as they tried desperately to camouflage themselves from being spotted.  OK, I’m well aware that this is less than stellar of a shot … LOL

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We also spotted several different porcupines in our travels.  One was feasting high up in a tree.  The other was on the ground munching on leaves, twigs, and downed branches from the nearby trees.  This particular one got out in the open and let me crawl around with them.  Contrary to popular belief, porcupines don’t throw their quills, so I was actually quite safe.

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There’s quite a large bison herd on the island as well.  They’re quite interesting to watch as they move slowly across the landscape and you become slowed down by them as they approach the roadway.  Makes me want to belt out with a round of “Oh give me a home…”.

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As we were leaving, we noticed the skies becoming quite beautiful in the rear view of the car.  I made Tom stop and my intention was to capture the moment.  I never did shoot it, but I think I got something better.

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There was a coyote pair hanging out right where we stopped!  Serendipity, I say!  One of them was actively hunting for food (I presume it was the female), while the other (I presume it was the male) followed along like it was stalking the other and just waiting for the right moment for something …. hmmm …. it was quite interesting.

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Either way, they were in gorgeous light as they made their way, all while the sunset was happening.

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On our drive back to SLC, the alpenglow on the Wasatch Range was amazing … such tones of blue, pink, and purple … gorgeous.  Sorry for ending with the moving shot from the iPhone camera, but it truly was gorgeous, so I had to share.

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Hope that you enjoyed Antelope Island SP!  I highly recommend a side trip to visit, if you’re ever in the SLC area.  Will be back to Florida sights and shots for the next blog post.

 

 

2012 Review: PART 7 – Back in the FLA

The remainder of 2012 was spent with family, friends, and of course, with nature – the ever-present beauty that surrounds us.

Parent killdeer with its newborn chick
Parent killdeer with its newborn chick
Crested caracara surveys its surroundings during a rain shower - Kenansville, FL
Crested caracara surveys its surroundings during a rain shower – Kenansville, FL
Wild horses of Paynes Prairie State Park, Gainesville, FL
Wild horses of Paynes Prairie State Park, Gainesville, FL
Fox squirrel at Joe Overstreet Landing
Fox squirrel at Joe Overstreet Landing
The sandhill crane pair that sings together .... stays together
The sandhill crane pair that sings together …. stays together
Juvenile bald eagle at Lake Marion, Kenansville, FL
Juvenile bald eagle at Lake Marion, Kenansville, FL
Lake Newnan, Alachua County, FL
Lake Newnan, Alachua County, FL
Great Blue Heron, Wakodahatchee Wetlands
Great Blue Heron, Wakodahatchee Wetlands
West Palm Beach night scene, FL
West Palm Beach night scene, FL
Barred owl pair perched in tree, Dinner Island Ranch WMA, FL
Barred owl pair perched in tree, Dinner Island Ranch WMA, FL
Northern harrier soaring, Green Cay Wetlands, FL
Northern harrier soaring, Green Cay Wetlands, FL

I want to be sure to thank those of you who shared our year’s experiences with us, somewhere along the way…. you know who you are.  It’s always good to see old friends, and of course, make new ones along the way.  Oh, and a special shout out to all who helped out immensely in Georgia – again, you know who you are!  Your friendship means the world to us!  One last person to thank for my 2012 – that’s a great BIG THANK YOU to my best friend, husband, adventure traveler, and sherpa – Tom.  Not sure what I would do without you.

Sherpa Tom
Sherpa Tom

So what’s on the burner for 2013?  Who knows really … but a sneak peek does involve another return trip to AK, visit with the kids in NY or wherever they land, and wherever else makes sense or my hearts tells me to go.  Life is an adventure that one must live to appreciate.  My favorite saying, which guides me in my life and provides me with much inspiration is:  “Life in not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away”.  Here’s to 2013 – BRING IT ON!

Hope that you’ve enjoyed a look back at my personal 2012.  I really welcome any and all comments and advice on this blog.  Here’s hoping I can keep this 2013 Resolution – a post a month or so (I give myself permission to “go with the flow”).  I wish you all a year full of life’s wonderful moments, great health, life-altering opportunities, and of course, adventure!  Life is only as good as the effort you put forth into it.

Take off from Beluga Lake, Homer, AK
Take off from Beluga Lake, Homer, AK
Thanks for hanging in as I looked back at 2012.  Now on to 2013!