Whole Lot Of Babies Going On

Springtime in the south Florida wetlands mean lots of activity in the natural rookeries.  Of course some bird unions happen earlier than others, so while some of the this year’s young is older than others … and some are still waiting for their new arrivals.DSC_3414But before long, even this green heron couple sees the fruits of their efforts in courtship, nest building, mating, incubating and protecting … as finally their babies hatch successfully and emerge for all of us to see.DSC_5167OK, so most birds are quite ugly (by normal standards) when they’re first emerged and yes, they go through that awkward stage as they grow up.  However, these little ones are so absolutely adorable (at least to me).DSC_5248All of those downy feathers, peach fuzz, and those faces … LOLDSC_5172Before long however, they will become competitive for their parents attention and more importantly their food.  Such cuteness though.  DSC_5168This parent-to-be black-necked stilt sits down on 4 eggs which are just waiting their own special introduction to the world.DSC_1047It must not be far away either … judging with how many times the parents got up and turned those speckled eggs frantically.  Such amazing parents, the black-necked stilts take turns tending to the nest, which is out in the open and made up of twigs, sticks, and small branches on the ground.DSC_1032They are such protective parents when before and after their young are born … always patrolling the shoreline for potential threats like alligators.DSC_2578Alas, the four little ones are introduced to the world, or more specifically the wetlands.  From birth, the little ones are expected to forage for themselves, so off they go.DSC_2631DSC_2768DSC_2516For protection, and I would expect for companionship, they tend to congregate together.DSC_1923When threats enter the area, they get a quick escort out of harms way.  I find it so funny how such a small, dainty-like bird can command so much respect to make a great blue heron fly away.DSC_2598After a few days, they begin to venture further away in their search for food.  They also have almost doubled their size.  Their cuteness factor doubled too.  🙂DSC_5588DSC_5652When they are ready for a rest, they run over to their mom and insert themselves into her underbelly feathers.  It’s funny to look at because all that you can see is their little legs hanging down.DSC_3336Looks like this “teenager” tri-colored heron just noticed its parent flying in nearby.  That usually means food.DSC_5999I give all of the credit in the world to these poor parents when it comes to feeding their offspring.  They run over and literally grab the parents beak … and neck … and face … in their attempt to get food NOW!  DSC_6024It’s not just the tri-colored herons, it’s almost all of the birds too, as evidenced by this great egret.  If I was a bird parent and my “children” treated me like that, I’m not sure I could keep going back!  LOLDSC_2737Of course when they return without food, the young ones just become loud and very alert … like these young cattle egret.DSC_6076Then there’s the sweet ducklings and this parent looks to have more than she can handle.  They’re generally community nesters, so perhaps she’s taking others out for a swim as well.  DSC_4812Such is the life in the wetlands during breeding season.  Another year, another brood.  Lots of memories and of course … lots of babies.

Next Up:  Back in Colorado

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

Naturally Florida

Spring season signals the time has come for birds to congregate, court, mate, nest, and raise their young.  The osprey are no different.  For me, spring also signals that a return trip to Blue Cypress Lake is in order.  This year I met up with some friends, bright and early, to try to capture the essence of this gorgeous place, as well as the wonderful osprey.

IMG_0901-1We got out on the water just in time for the sun to begin to emerge on the horizon.  This year, the wind was quite strong and thus the water choppy at times.  Didn’t make much of a difference though at sunrise.  Yes, it’s going to be a fabulous day!_DSC9017Our first juvenile osprey was spotted … as it waited patiently for its parents to return.  The young osprey are easy to differentiate from the adults by that orange eye, versus the yellow eyes of its parents._DSC5416There was a plethora of activity going on that morning.  Some of the osprey were sitting on nests … some were reinforcing their nests … some were out fishing … some were out learning to fly … some were defending their “air space”.  This fabulous osprey was multi-tasking bring ing back both nesting materials and dinner to its nest.  LOL_DSC5624Of course, there were more than osprey hanging out in the lake.  Always fascinating to watch, photograph, and listen to, were the black-bellied whistling-ducks.  When they take flight overhead, you quickly realize where they got that name from._DSC5879_DSC5903To give you a perspective of the nests, which number in the hundreds, and the beauty in which they exist, take a look at this image.  Gorgeous cycpress trees, filled with spanish moss, are the settings for the nests.  Talk about a room with a view … :-)._DSC6073There were so many osprey flying around that I had a bit of difficulty figuring out which osprey to follow.  I know, it’s a good problem to have._DSC5995_DSC6083Talons on predator birds have long captured my fascination.  When an osprey launches into the air and those talons get exposed, it’s a moment that I anticipate hugely, as I try to perfect that exact moment._DSC6168As you can tell, many of the nests are nice and low, which offer the photographer a great view at the occupants of the nests.  Notice those orange eyes … juvenile or adult?  Juvenile of course.  I absolutely love their feather markings too.  Much darker and distinct._DSC6265On this particularly windy day, the birds were fairly predictable in their flight pattern, as birds will always take off and land into the wind._DSC6325Taking advantage of the wind, they flew around quite a bit, almost taunting the others to take chase._DSC6367Many times, we witnessed attacks inflight, though often they were just having fun._DSC6369_DSC6375This juvenile osprey had been flying around the lake a bit and was coming for a landing.  I love this “orchestra conductor” pose, as they extend out their wings and obtain full feather benefit in helping them to slow down as they approach their landing._DSC6383Once again, those gorgeous talons extend as they pick their favorite branch to land on._DSC6438Not sure how many osprey were out there flying around, but safe to say it was far more than I could photograph.  Some flew high, some flew low, all were gorgeous inflight and exhillerating to watch._DSC6495This young one returns to the nest._DSC6548Following right behind it was the parent landed right behind it.  Notice the yellow eyes._DSC6565As beautiful as the adult osprey are, it’s the juveniles that get my pulse racing.  _DSC6581Again, it’s not just osprey … we saw anhingas, woodpeckers, sandhill cranes, ibis, wood storks, herons, etc.  Here’s another visitor … the red-shoulder hawk, which posed nicely on top of the tree for us._DSC6590While looking for other birds, we happened to find this beautiful black-crowned night heron.  Love that red eye!_DSC6607OK, any image that has both talons and all of this feather details and fluff is considered to be super special in my book._DSC6699The only thing that it was missing was that gorgeous orange eye.  Yes, we sure were treated to an amazing air show.  🙂_DSC6757Yes, this is the true natural Florida … as it was … as it wish that it could be everywhere again.  At least, I know, that there are still places that I can go in Florida to get simple moments like this.  🙂_DSC9026Hope that everyone enjoyed.

Next up:  More burrowing owls

© 2016  TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com