Sheep, Deer, & Views … Western CO

So, I think that this blog was going to be about the San Juan Mountains and surrounding areas, but oh well, I changed my mind.  LOL.  I thought that instead I would share more images of the area landscapes and wildlife in my more immediate area.  Are we good with that?  🙂

From our windows, we have amazing views of the Colorado National Monument.  The wonderful red rock formations are stunning, especially after a rainfall or when the sunlight is hitting it just right and illuminating the rocks.  So many colors, like painted rocks or striations in the layers.  Just really peaceful and beautiful.

DSC_8052-EditFor me, the desert bighorn sheep are always the highlight of my visit and it’s always a dreat day when I do.  On this day, we ran across a gathering of the ladies.  I’m always so impressed with how naturally they act when we encounter them.DSC_7677-EditNo different than other wildlife, they’re eyes engage me and their thoughts are a mystery to me that I always try, though never will, to figure out.  🙂DSC_7693-EditDSC_7605-Edit-EditWhile the close up views of their faces are always fascinating, so are the more natural ones where the sheep may not even know I’m watching.  DSC_7657-Edit-EditLots of mule deer are always present and I really enjoy photographing them as well.  This handsome buck posed nicely for me … in the midst of the wilderness.  Often they fear onlookers, and perhaps with good reason, but if you remain still, they almost seem to enjoy an impromptu photo session.  LOLDSC_7876Fun to see the younger generation being mentored by their elders.DSC_7752Speaking of “being schooled” … how about this sequence of this beautiful buck showing how to properly jump the fence.  DSC_7739DSC_7741DSC_7742We watched the entire group make the jump successfully.  So fun to observe and photograph.  Then we came across this really handsome buck … staring us down.  There goes that eye contact again.  After some time, he went on with his foraging on the landscape, which really pleased us.DSC_7979Back on the Monument, we came across a whole herd of desert bighorn sheep.  They are a subspecies of the bighorn sheep usually associated with the mountainous areas, but as one would expect, living in a desert primarily, they are a bit smaller in size.  However, I’m sure that everyone would agree that they’re equally as cute.DSC_8358-Edit-EditThis particular male was in charge of this group of lovely ladies.  Aren’t their eyes so amazing?  They have excellent eyesight, capable of viewing a predator over a mile away, and their eyes also help in guiding them on the rocky cliffs from which they live.DSC_8223Here’s a shot of just a few of them within the herd.  The adult male in the forefront center is keenly watching us.DSC_8155Of all of the desert bighorn sheep ewes up there, this particular one is always easy to identify and fun to photograph.  She’s missing one of her horns, which unfortunately don’t grow back.  But you can’t tell me that she doesn’t look quite happy!  🙂DSC_8435Sometimes, try as you may, you don’t find them.  Sometimes you can spot them through your binoculars or hear them in the distance.  Then sometimes, you just can’t seem to get away them … or pass them … like when they’re causing a “bighorn jam” in the middle of the narrow winded round.  It’s OK, I could watch them forever it seems.DSC_8313Yes, the beauty of the Colorado National Monument red rock formations is a sight to see, whether you take it in up close and personal like this … or when you wake up and see it out of your bedroom window … it’s all beautiful and all good.  🙂DSC_8057-EditHope that you enjoyed the blog and have gained an appreciation of the beauty of western Colorado … just minutes from Utah.

Next Up:  More around town sightings … you just never know what you’ll see

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

Advertisements

My World That Surrounds Me

In late fall/early winter, the Grand Valley area of western Colorado plays host to a variety of migrating birds.  Of course, one of my favorites are the sandhill cranes.  It’s not unusual to see groups of 1,000 or more in the early morning or pre-dusk hours, as they roost in the farmlands.  Mostly we see adults, though sometimes you get a few teenagers.

DSC_6171-Edit-2Whenever I see sandhill cranes, I’m immediately taken back to one of my first encounters of fields of them, back at Creamer’s Field in Fairbanks, AK.  There’s few sights or sounds as beautiful as congregating and celebrating sandhills.  Don’t even get me going as to how fabulous they are when courting.  🙂DSC_6223-Edit-Edit-2Home in Colorado now, I’ve had my share of “new” birds.  Now this doesn’t mean that these birds are “lifers” for me, but to have them share my immediate surroundings, has been a thrill.  One of them that I take great joy in viewing is the Steller’s Jay.  Such attitude it seems to possess with that fancy crested ‘do … I always stop to grab a shot or two when I see them.DSC_6503-Edit-2DSC_6516-2Often hanging out with the jays are the Clark’s Nutcrackers … also in the jay family, they’re quite social and beautiful as well.DSC_6384-2DSC_6413-2To say that I’ve seen my fair share of the Canada Goose is an understatement.  Some days it seems as though every field or body of water is filled with them.  I’ve delighted in watching and yes, hearing them as they arrive to any given lake or such.  Calling out, organizing themselves in that V-formation that they’re known for, as well as performing acrobatic maneuvers as they approach their landing … it’s all been fascinating to be part of.DSC_7463-Edit-Edit-2Now perhaps I’ve seen snow geese before, but if I did I probably didn’t realize what they were.  The snow goose has been a thrill to observe as well, though for the most part, I’ve found them to be a bit frustrating to photograph at a close proximity.  LOL.  Oh well, I’m sure that they don’t care.DSC_8480-2One day, though, they treated me to some nice captures.  Just wished that they spread themselves out a bit. DSC_8500-Edit-Edit-2I just loved the way they swam about, walked the shoreline, preened themselves, and took floating naps on the waters surface.  So very beautiful they were._DSC3771-Edit-2Not a stranger to me was the pied-billed grebes which I see regularly in Colorado as well as I did in Florida.DSC_8671-2When the white-crowned sparrow is in the area, you cannot ignore or mistake its song, movement, or sight.  Though I’ve seen them in FL occasionally, they seem to be everyday sightings here.  DSC_8694-Edit-Edit-2The Western scrub jay, which is now referred to as the Woodhouse’s scrub jay, is another bird that I’ve taken a delight to.  This particular one was taken on a very cold day, so it was a bit fluffed up, resembling more of a mountain bluebird!  LOLDSC_8843-Edit-2Now all of these birds already shared doesn’t mean that there aren’t any 4-legged wildlife out in the area.  How about this one?  Honestly, it was one of the most beautiful (or handsome) coyotes I had ever seen.  ❤DSC_8740-2One last look back at me before it trotted off into the wilderness.  Loved it!DSC_8745-2Cousins to the bighorn sheep, only a smaller version, the desert bighorn sheep are always a fun way to spend a day.  By now, the females have most likely dropped their young, so this shot reminds me that I need to return to the scene to check things out again.DSC_9072-2Of course this area is home to many herds of mule deer.  This particular guy had one of the most fascinating, though quite odd, set of antlers.  Has anyone ever seen anything like that before?  I mean, within the mule deer?DSC_6298-2About an hour or so east of Fruita is the town of Rifle, CO, home to Rifle Falls State Park.  Rifle Falls is a triple waterfall amidst the natural stone formations found in the area.  So unique and quite a thrill to photograph when the frost forms on the accompanying rocks and vegetation._DSC3697-2_DSC3699-2So, I hope that you enjoyed a peek into the beauty that surrounds me in western Colorado.  As I now enter a 3rd season here, I can’t wait to see what the future holds.  🙂

Next Up:  The San Juan Mountains

© 2018  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

Back to Mesa County

First of all, sorry for the long hiatus from the blog posts … 2 months to be exact!  How in the world was that even possible?  I can’t even say that I had a good excuse.  I think I was just running on overdrive for some time and I have to admit, I’m having challenges in keeping focused.  Not much is the same routine since we moved out to Colorado.  Not that we have any regrets at all, far from it in fact, just working through the adjustments.

That being said, let’s head back up to the Colorado National Monument, which is precisely 4 miles from our home.  We like to head up there every now and then because the views are spectacular._DSC2900-EditOf course, besides the valley views, I always hope to find some of the desert bighorn sheep which reside there.  Desert bighorns are a smaller subspecies of the Rocky Mountain bighorns, though I’m not sure I would know the difference without them standing next to each other.  We’ve been pretty fortunate with our sightings of these beautiful animals.DSC_9468Sometimes we find them just off the roadside (as in the above above), but not always.  It’s always fun when they investigate us as much as we do them.  DSC_9497They are quite intriguing to me … as they have such big beautiful brown eyes, which stare intently while I’m photographing.  Usually, they just stand still, except for continuing to chew on some recently grazed edibles … and they stare … and stare … and stare some more.  LOLDSC_9501-EditOf course, the Monument and other areas are also filled with their fair share of rabbits.  In fact, we find them grazing in our yard most mornings.DSC_0403Predators, such as hawks are quite common as well.  While in Florida, our most predominant hawk was the red-shouldered hawk, but in CO you won’t find any of those.  What you will find predominantly are red-tailed hawks.  DSC_0240-EditSongbirds, such as the western meadowlark are commonly seen along the sides of the lesser traveled roads ….DSC_0416-Edit-Edit… as well as the horned larks.DSC_0431On day during the summer, we were out and about in the area and came across a small field of beautiful sunflowers.  Of course, I had to check them out and grab a few photographs.DSC_0106-EditDSC_0127DSC_0177-EditDSC_0164-EditYep, the area has lots to offer … hiking, biking, photography, you name it.  So many places to get lost (well hopefully not lost – LOL) and off the beaten track for some solitude and “alone with nature” time._DSC2905-EditCan’t believe that it’s almost the 365th day of 2017!  Where does the time go?  I guess it’s true …. time flies when you’re having fun!  As we approach a brand new year – 2018 – I want to wish everyone best wishes for that new year … and adventure, health, happiness, and love.

Next Up:  From my final Florida shoot in 2017.

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

Mesa County Exploring

As many of you know, we recently bought a home in Colorado.  So, it’s only fitting to share some images from some of our early days in town … whether still scoping a home  or after we moved out.

No one can talk about western slope and forgo the mentioning of the Colorado National Monument.   “The Monument” is a unit of the National Park Service (NPS) made up of canyons  etched in the sandstone and granite red rock formations.   One enters the park either through the east (Grand Junction) or the west (Fruita) and drives along the 14-mile high desert road, which features amazing landscapes like these._DSC2900-EditWhile some of the views overlook the valley floor below, some illustrate the grandeur of the landscape and the unique formations it possesses._DSC2905-Edit_DSC2237The Monument is home to a variety of trees, plants, insects, reptiles, birds and of course mammal wildlife, such as my favorite desert bighorn sheep.  We often find them grazing on the landscape and have even seen them congregating together and participating in some early sparing.  Believe it or not, when they ram heads, it echoes throughout the canyon.DSC_9501-EditViews from the pullouts are varied by the turn, by the season, by the time of day, and the weather.  So far, no day has been the same as another._DSC2156Even the birds have been different for me.  DSC_4436Of course, familiar bird “friends” also have shown up … like the osprey and bald eagles.DSC_4331A bit more surprising for me to see is the great blue herons also flying around.  They’re not on every corner like they are in Florida, but they’re also not unusual to see.  DSC_4357While out and about one morning, I heard a familiar sound … a meadowlark … but a western meadowlark.DSC_0416-Edit-EditNot to be confused with the horned lark, which was a new bird for me.DSC_0431Often seen are the rabbits which roam about and the prairie dogs which are seemingly everywhere.DSC_0403Yep, this is my new home … somewhere … out there … under that rainbow._DSC2201Next up:  More burrowing owls … so cute I can’t stay away (or forget)  🙂

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com