My World That Surrounds Me

In late fall/early winter, the Grand Valley area of western Colorado plays host to a variety of migrating birds.  Of course, one of my favorites are the sandhill cranes.  It’s not unusual to see groups of 1,000 or more in the early morning or pre-dusk hours, as they roost in the farmlands.  Mostly we see adults, though sometimes you get a few teenagers.

DSC_6171-Edit-2Whenever I see sandhill cranes, I’m immediately taken back to one of my first encounters of fields of them, back at Creamer’s Field in Fairbanks, AK.  There’s few sights or sounds as beautiful as congregating and celebrating sandhills.  Don’t even get me going as to how fabulous they are when courting.  🙂DSC_6223-Edit-Edit-2Home in Colorado now, I’ve had my share of “new” birds.  Now this doesn’t mean that these birds are “lifers” for me, but to have them share my immediate surroundings, has been a thrill.  One of them that I take great joy in viewing is the Steller’s Jay.  Such attitude it seems to possess with that fancy crested ‘do … I always stop to grab a shot or two when I see them.DSC_6503-Edit-2DSC_6516-2Often hanging out with the jays are the Clark’s Nutcrackers … also in the jay family, they’re quite social and beautiful as well.DSC_6384-2DSC_6413-2To say that I’ve seen my fair share of the Canada Goose is an understatement.  Some days it seems as though every field or body of water is filled with them.  I’ve delighted in watching and yes, hearing them as they arrive to any given lake or such.  Calling out, organizing themselves in that V-formation that they’re known for, as well as performing acrobatic maneuvers as they approach their landing … it’s all been fascinating to be part of.DSC_7463-Edit-Edit-2Now perhaps I’ve seen snow geese before, but if I did I probably didn’t realize what they were.  The snow goose has been a thrill to observe as well, though for the most part, I’ve found them to be a bit frustrating to photograph at a close proximity.  LOL.  Oh well, I’m sure that they don’t care.DSC_8480-2One day, though, they treated me to some nice captures.  Just wished that they spread themselves out a bit. DSC_8500-Edit-Edit-2I just loved the way they swam about, walked the shoreline, preened themselves, and took floating naps on the waters surface.  So very beautiful they were._DSC3771-Edit-2Not a stranger to me was the pied-billed grebes which I see regularly in Colorado as well as I did in Florida.DSC_8671-2When the white-crowned sparrow is in the area, you cannot ignore or mistake its song, movement, or sight.  Though I’ve seen them in FL occasionally, they seem to be everyday sightings here.  DSC_8694-Edit-Edit-2The Western scrub jay, which is now referred to as the Woodhouse’s scrub jay, is another bird that I’ve taken a delight to.  This particular one was taken on a very cold day, so it was a bit fluffed up, resembling more of a mountain bluebird!  LOLDSC_8843-Edit-2Now all of these birds already shared doesn’t mean that there aren’t any 4-legged wildlife out in the area.  How about this one?  Honestly, it was one of the most beautiful (or handsome) coyotes I had ever seen.  ❤DSC_8740-2One last look back at me before it trotted off into the wilderness.  Loved it!DSC_8745-2Cousins to the bighorn sheep, only a smaller version, the desert bighorn sheep are always a fun way to spend a day.  By now, the females have most likely dropped their young, so this shot reminds me that I need to return to the scene to check things out again.DSC_9072-2Of course this area is home to many herds of mule deer.  This particular guy had one of the most fascinating, though quite odd, set of antlers.  Has anyone ever seen anything like that before?  I mean, within the mule deer?DSC_6298-2About an hour or so east of Fruita is the town of Rifle, CO, home to Rifle Falls State Park.  Rifle Falls is a triple waterfall amidst the natural stone formations found in the area.  So unique and quite a thrill to photograph when the frost forms on the accompanying rocks and vegetation._DSC3697-2_DSC3699-2So, I hope that you enjoyed a peek into the beauty that surrounds me in western Colorado.  As I now enter a 3rd season here, I can’t wait to see what the future holds.  🙂

Next Up:  The San Juan Mountains

© 2018  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

Colts! No Not Horses Either ;-)

Cranes … OK, I know that everyone knows that I love bears and now everyone is aware that I love owls as well … but what about cranes?  Well, they come in as a very close third place for the attention of my viewfinder and the affection of my heart.  Cranes … whether they be sandhill cranes, whooping cranes, Japanese cranes (which incidentally is on a short list for me to photograph one day) … really doesn’t matter, I love them all.  So much so that I have crowned myself as an official “craniac”.  😉

So when my good friends, Jess and Michael alerted me of sandhill crane babies, that’s all I needed to hear.  I was on my way, this year, with my wallet!  (OK, I have been known to leave home without not just my American Express, but my entire wallet!).  I was so anxious to get there that I arrived almost an entire hour prior to the roads being open.  LOL

It didn’t take long before I found the nest, with one of the parents sitting on it, in the wee early hours of the morning.  I got my gear out and waited anxiously for the moment that the baby sandhill cranes, called colts, would pop their heads up from the parents topside back feathers._DSC9095To my surprise, it was a bit uneventful and unexpected as the first of the pair of colts backed out of the feathers without peeking upwards first.  After it backed up a bit, it clumsily fell, then ran back to the protection of the parent._DSC9102At the point it got the attention of the parent, who undoubtedly felt the other colt getting a bit anxious as well, though still covered up._DSC9123The colt scurried itself back into the parents protective wings for comfort.  See, the other parent was still out foraging and this one wouldn’t get up until it was back in sight.  I guess the task of taking care of both of the colts simultaneously and alone was too much of a job to handle.  Before long, one colt delighted us by popping its head up … the parent turned to look._DSC9182Then the second head popped up and they were both vocalizing a bit.  At this point, everyone was either silent and taking rapid images … or intermittently taking images and squealing at the same time.  Can you guess which one I was?  LOL_DSC9223As with most siblings, there’s always a bit of rivalry going on and the two colts began a bit of a friendly confrontation._DSC9260The sight of a young newborn colt emerging from the natural featherbed that the parents offer is a sight that I can barely describe when it comes to the joy I feel when witnessing it.  “Be still, my heart” is all that I can think._DSC9356-EditSoon they were both off of the parent and playing together.  Sandhill crane eggs generally will hatch, via the colts pip tooth, about a day apart.  When hatched, they’re fully feathered and shortly after their drying period, they are able to walk about and even swim.  They do need the parents to feed them initially and sandhill cranes make the best parents._DSC9629-EditMom and dad communicate with them though gestures and a series of sounds and it always impresses me how quickly the colts learn and tow the line._DSC9542This pair of colts was so adorable and I really didn’t perceive too much difference in size.  It took a while for the other parent to return and the colts were getting a bit antsy.DSC_3238One of my favorite poses with these colts is the interactive poses with their parents.  I’m pretty sure that this sandhill crane parent is quite pleased with their newborn colts.  Going nose to nose simply pulls at my heartstrings. DSC_3246I think that this colt is trying to its mom or dad that they’re hungry!  DSC_3253Staying close to the nest sight and next to the parent the two colts have to settle their need for food and activity until the partner crane shows up._DSC9691Their young lives are full of learning and fun, but also full of danger.  I pray that they will be safe as they grow up…. and have lots more colts of their own one day.

In the meanwhile, I have just one question … does anyone else out there love the cranes and colts as much as I do?  If so, annoint yourself as a self-proclaimed “craniac” and join the club! _DSC9737Next up:  From the wetlands of Florida to the mountains of Colorado

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com