All Around the Neighborhood

So, most people think that I’m a birder because I photograph them a lot.  Truth be told, I’m really not … I just happen to live in Florida and therefore I photograph what I have locally … BIRDS.

One day, I walked outside because I could hear what sounded like a symphony of various birds in the trees.  When I investigated further, it was actually just a European starling nestled in the palm fronds.  How could so many sounds be coming out of one particular bird?  Well, the European starlings are quite talented in that regard and can mimic up to 20 species of birds!DSC_3004After a good bit of time, I noticed many more starlings flying in and out as well.  This species is quite prolific in breeding and not native to the area.  Back in the early 1890’s, an industrialist released 100 birds in NYC’s Central Park, wanting to establish in the US, all of the birds mentioned by Shakespeare.  There are now an astounding 200 million of them!DSC_2979
They are known to be quite the bullies too, evicting woodpeckers from their tree cavities after pretty much having done all of the work.  Eventually they take over the cavity for themselves, leaving the woodpeckers to do double the effort by excavating a new one.  As you can see, they raise their young in no time.DSC_1623One cold day (by south Florida standards), we were out in the backyard moving about, when I spotted something spying on me from a sandy location in the yard.  Upon careful inspection, we found this iguana.  It was laying there pretty motionless … see they are quite the warmblooded reptiles, which have difficulty surviving in the cold.  We think that it was laying in the dark dirt area, trying to soak up some of the heat from the ground.  It was about 3.5 feet long and quite beautiful.DSC_2641A while back, I noticed that in photography, I have a preference towards textures, colors, and eye details.  This buddy had them all.  I just loved how its dewlap (the hanging flap of skin under its jaw) moved about, even with its tiniest of movements.  The spiny spikes down its back would raise on alert when we approached.  Knowing that it was cold, I was a bit braver than usual near it, though we always gave it space and respect.  DSC_2720Its friend was waiting near by on the roof of my neighbor’s detached garage.  I just loved the way that the trees in the background provided a fun bokeh for the image.DSC_2734-EditOf course, when it stood up and gave us some attitude of its own, everything was even more interesting … including that lit up bokeh.DSC_2784Before we let them carry on with their day, I couldn’t help but focus in on that face.  Notice the tiny teeth and that tongue.  Gosh, to me they’re quite fascinating to observe and contemplate how their live is.  A few years back, we had one digging in our rocky landscape, we thought to burrow a home for eggs, but we never saw any young ones, so it must have been for a “dummy nest”.DSC_2807-EditNot in our yard obviously, but in our county, we also had the pleasure of photographing a mated pair of bald eagles nesting … and raising 3 young eaglets.  It was quite fascinating to see.DSC_7781They protected their young with vigilance too … especially when sub-adult bald eagles came by to inspect the goings on at the nest.DSC_8099Dad though would always escort it out and return to the nest to help mom out.  We didn’t go there often because the area was patrolled and wanted to keep onlookers out to not interfere with the nesting process.  Of course, we complied with that request.  I did hear that all 3 have successfully fledged.  What amazing parents!DSC_7756Next Up:  “Hoo” do you think?

© 2017  Debbie Tubridy / TNWA Photography

http://www.tnwaphotography.com

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