More Burrowing Owls … Say What?

So, during the 2017 burrowing owl season of raising the young owlets, I knew that we were moving to Colorado before I could get another years worth of the “owl fun”.  I was determined to get my fill, if you will, of these incredibly personable cuties.  These images in this, as well as the others posted in the last year, have been from the 2017 season. With that, I invite you to sit back and check out this next installment of images … and laugh if you will, but appreciate how amazing these little owls are.

Adult burrowing owls, especially the dads, play a huge role in keeping the intruders at bay or at least keeping their family safe from them.  Often that means issuing the call for them to rapidly retreat into the burrow for safety.  To help them identify any threats in their environment, they often perch on the stakes in their area to get a better vantage point.

DSC_8010Early in the season, both parents are often found at and above the burrow.  Sometimes they’re coughing up pellets …..DSC_8529….. sometimes they’re simply spending some much needed time preening themselves …..DSC_8590….. sometimes they’re staring upward towards the sky looking at predators, other flying birds, planes, insects, or the errant helium balloon.DSC_0188After a call is issued to dive into the burrow, they eventually emerge … cautiously I might add.  The owl on the left is one of the parents, while the other is a young owlet which is obviously a bit more timid and cautious.DSC_8542You may have noticed a slight difference in the color of the eyes in the adult and young in the above image.  See, while burrowing owls usually have the traditional lemon yellow eyes, they don’t always.  As you can see below, sometimes the adults or the owlets have very dark (almost alien looking) eyes.  It’s not that the younger owl dark eyes will change, it’s just how they’re born.  I find both to be so fascinating … as well as the variety of variations in between.  🙂DSC_4613The young owlets are quite the inquisitive bunch … and you can almost see their minds working as they try to figure out the significance of everything that they see.DSC_4729This trio is all from the same burrow and much like our own children can have different eye colors, so can these owls … all from the same set of parents.  I just love how they tend to follow each others focal point.DSC_4698Burrowing owls, as their name implies, make their homes in burrows on the ground.  Now that I live in Colorado, which also has burrowing owls (more on that later), an obvious difference between them is that in Florida, these owls dig their own burrows in the grasses.  In Colorado, they make residence in abandoned prairie dog burrows.  They are also residential in Florida, while transient in Colorado, though they raise their young in both.DSC_8766The stare of any owl is quite intense and powerful and these little guys are no different.DSC_8683What seems like silly antics in these owls are actually how they see and interpret their world.  They perform these extreme head twists in an effort to triangulate coordinates, distances, etc.DSC_9858One of the most endearing moments is that when the young owlets are interacting with the adults, such as this moment of the mom feeding a worm to its young.  Such patient parents.DSC_0093It’s usually not long before the young owls are out and about and testing their own skills for securing their own food.  Soon they will be on their own and obviously that’s a very important life skill.DSC_9916Looks like this one was pretty successful in tearing into its meal and devouring it.DSC_9784Each owl has its own personality and believe it or not, the observer can tell them all apart for the individuals that they are.  I mean, how could anyone not love these cuties?DSC_0076While mom plays more of a role feeding the young the food that the dad hunts down, the dad sometimes needs a break and retreats into a nice shady tree for some rest, relaxation, and mainly quiet time.  LOLDSC_8738Yes the life of a burrowing owl is quite an interesting one … and whether they’re warm and dry … or wet and soggy as this one is … their expressions are endless and personalities varied, but they all are pretty social and definitely ADORABLE!DSC_9793I hope that everyone enjoyed the burrowing owl images … I do have one more installment coming up in the near future.

Next Up:  As long as we’re talking about owls … how about some personal time with some screech owls?

© 2018  TNWA Photography / Debbie Tubridy

http://www.tnwaphotography.com            www.tnwaphotography.wordpress.com

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